Sunday, April 22, 2018

A Quiet Place

It's great that A Quiet Place has become the latest horror film sensation. Directed and starring John Krasinski and his wife Emily Blunt, the movie takes us to a near future where the majority of the people of Earth have been wiped out by blind alien creatures with hypersensitive hearing. They play a husband and wife trying to survive in a farm, along with their two children. One of their children was killed by one of the creatures as a result of a noisy, battery operated toy that attracted one of the monsters. The family has been able to survive for an additional year communicating with one another through sign language. But the future looks dismal for them. The wife is pregnant.  How is she going to give birth without making a sound? And, of course, how is the newborn baby going to come into what's left of the world, and not cry? The premise presents a nightmare that they may not be able to survive, and this makes for a fantastic horror film that keeps us on the edge of our seats, and makes us chew our popcorn as quietly as possible. It's like watching a well-crafted silent movie, and undoubtedly the quietest film ever produced by Michael Bay.

The film fits today's concept of smart horror. It has a unique monster, unique horror situations, characters that make intelligent decisions, and definite franchise potential. Although, I wish that they would leave it alone, and not turn it into a Blumhouse style series. Rarely has there been a film where you could hear a pin drop in the theater. So distant from DC and Marvel, and their ear-splitting Dolbyized worlds.

When conductor Sir Georg Solti visited the Metropolitan Opera with a Paris Opera production of Mozart's The Marriage of Figaro, he held down the sound of the orchestra and the singers. With the sound low, the audience at the MET started leaning in to hear every word and listen to every note. As a director, Mr. Krasinski does the same thing with this film. The lower the sound level, the closer we move to the edge of our seats. The fact that he manages to maintain us in this position for a fast moving 95 minutes is the utter success of this fine film.

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